Paintings
Paintings, lifeless images rendered in colourful goop. Though the Simpsons has an art style of it's own, it does include some very famous paintings and sculptures within it. Here's a list of all the paintings featured on the Simpsons. The full view images contain a smaller version of the original.

Bridge over a Pond of Water Lilies, Claude Monet, 1899
When Bart is sent to France on the Foreign Exchange Program, his escort, Cesar drives him through several French based paintings. Monet's Bridge Over a Pond of Water Lilies is the first they pass through.
Real World Location: Metropolitan Museum of Art, Manhattan, New York
Featured in: 7G13 - The Crepes of Wrath
Wheatfield with Crows, Vincent Van Gogh, 1890
When Bart is sent to France on the Foreign Exchange Program, his escort, Cesar drives him through several French based paintings. Van Gogh's Wheatfield with Crows is the second they pass through. As they drive by, the crows within the painting fly away.
Real World Location: Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam
Featured in: 7G13 - The Crepes of Wrath
The Dream, Henri Rousseau, 1910
When Bart is sent to France on the Foreign Exchange Program, his escort, Cesar drives him through several French based paintings. Rousseau's The Dream is the third they pass through. As they drive by, the woman and animals look at them, shocked.
Real World Location: Museum of Modern Art, Manhattan, New York
Featured in: 7G13 - The Crepes of Wrath
The Luncheon on the Grass, Édouard Manet, 1863
When Bart is sent to France on the Foreign Exchange Program, his escort, Cesar drives him through several French based paintings. Manet's The Luncheon on the Grass is the fourth they pass through. As they drive by, Bart responds, "Ooh-Laa-Laa" for some reason.
Real World Location: Musée d'Orsay, Paris
Featured in: 7G13 - The Crepes of Wrath
David, Michelangelo, 1504
Michelangelo's David is to tour the US which includes Springfield as one of it's locations, but the Women of Springfield protest it because it's nudity. With Marge's recent protesting of Itchy and Scratchy, they request Marge to lead the protest, she refuses. Due to her protesting one form of expression and favouring another, Itchy and Scratchy is violent again and David stays in Springfield.
Homer also has a fantasy of playing Table Football againt Michelngelo's David and winning when Marge is thinking of ideas to nurture Lisa's talent, The Scream then challenges Homer.
Real World Location: Accademia di Belle Arti Firenze, Florence
Featured in: 7F09 - Itchy and Scratchy and Marge, 3G02 - Lisa's Sax
Nighthawks, Edward Hopper, 1942
While Grampa wanders around Springfield looking for what he wants to spend his money on, he makes a stop in a Diner where the angle is set up to be exactly like Nighthawks, the people witin the diner are also within the original, except for Grampa of course.
Rex Banner celebrates his birthday in a similar diner, shown from a similar angle, where this time, it releates to the painting with Prohibition set in Springfield, unhappy about not capturing the Beer Baron (Homer)
Real World Location: Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
Featured in: 7F17 - Old Money, 4F15 - Homer vs. The Eighteenth Ammendment
Creation of Adam, Michelangelo, 1511
When Homer and Bart come to retreive a letter that Homer wrote for Mr. Burns in anger now regretting it, Homer goes to the post office where there is a mural featuring a parody of the creation of Adam.
At the Springfield Film Festival, the title screen for Mr. Burns's Movie, "A Burns for All Seasons" has the backdrop with a parody of The Creation of Adam, featuring Mr. Burns touching fingers with God. The film features Mr. Burns as himself, and Bumblebee Man as a supporting role, the film was also directed by Señor Spielbergo.
Homer discovers that he has a stunning sining voice when he lies down, but gains a huge fanbase, one of which happens to be obsessed with him and when Homer fires her as a protector, she tries to kill him. Marge thwarts the plan and Homer quits the opera business, and takes up a new passion, painting. Specifially, a parody of the Creation of Adam on the living room ceiling.
Real World Location: Sistine Chapel, Vatican City
Featured in: 7F22 - Blood Feud, 2F31 - A Star is Burns, JABF18 - Homer of Seville
Vitruvian Man, Leonardo da Vinci, 1487
When Homer fails the Fatherhood Test, he phones the National Fatherhood institute to alert them, and behind the head of the institute, there is a huge mural, of a father playing with his son in a parody of the Vitruvian Man.
While in a museum with Marge for inspiration for his work, Homer has a dream of various artworks attacking him. The Vitruvian Man attacks Homer several times.
Real World Location: Gallerie dell'Accademia, Venice
Featured in: 8F07 - Saturdays of Thunder, AABF15 - Mom and Pop Art
Venus De Milo, Alexandros of Antioch, 100BC
When Mr. Burns and Smithers go down into Burns's basement for Smithers to outline all the valuables he has, in the background, one said valuable is the Venus De Milo, Burns just wonders what happened to Bobo.
At the Candy Convension, Homer sees a rare Gummi Venus De Milo. Marge unintenionally creates a distraction, and Homer steals the Gummi Venus De Milo. Somehow he loses it onto the Passenger Seat of his car where it gets stuck to Ashley Grant's butt. Homer pulls it off and eats it. But he is accused of Sexual Harrasment.
The Gummi Venus De Milo appears in The Simpsons Game again on all consoles except the Nintendo DS as a powerup for Homer. Eating them allows Homer to charge his Gummi Meter which enables him to transform into Gummi Homer and fire Gummi Grenades.
Real World Location: Louvre, Paris
Featured in: 1F01 - Rosebud, 2F06 - Homer Badman, The Simpsons Game
Giorgio de Chirico style, 1909-1974
Not based on any specific painting by Giorgio de Chirico, there is painting that has a shadow of Marge against a wall, as Bart introductes the stories for the Halloween Episode.
Featured in: 1F04 - Treehouse of Horror IV
Note that the dates listed above are the dates inbetween de Chirico's first painting and his last, not his birth and death
Self Portrait, Vincent Van Gogh, 1887
As Bart introduces the stories for the Halloween Episode, various parodies of popular paintings from a large number of artists appear in the background one such parody is a Self Portrait of Van Gogh. Though the parody features Homer instead, Homer's normal white shirt is now a mix of green shades.
Real World Location: Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo
Featured in: 1F04 - Treehouse of Horror IV
The Persistence of Memory, Salvador Dalí, 1931
As Bart introduces the stories for the Halloween Episode, various parodies of popular paintings from a large number of artists appear in the background one such parody is Salvador Dalí's Persistence of Memory. Though this time, instead of Clocks melting, it is now Maggie melting among a large number of Pacifiers.
While in a museum with Marge for inspiration for his work, Homer has a dream featuring several artworks. Homer finds himself waking up in the middle of a field full of melting clocks, one drips on him.
Real World Location: Museum of Modern Art, Manhattan, New York City
Featured in: 1F04 - Treehouse of Horror IV, AABF15 - Mom and Pop Art
Ascending and Descending, M. C. Escher, 1960
While Bart is introducing the stories for the epsiode, various parodies of paintings are shown behind him. One such parody featrues several copies of Homer chasing Bart down an endless stairway in the style of M. C. Escher's Ascending and Descending.
Featured in: 1F04 - Treehouse of Horror IV
The Scream, Edvard Munch, 1893
As Bart introduces the stories for the Halloween Episode, varios parodies of popular paintings from a large number of artists appear in the background one such parody is Edvard Munch's Scream. Though this time, it features Lisa screaming. This has since become a popular image online alongside a version with Homer.
Homer also has a fantasy of playing Table Football againt Michelngelo's David and winning when Marge is thinking of ideas to nurture Lisa's talent, The Scream then challenges Homer.
When Bart discovers that he has a street named after him, he steals the sign for which he shows Jimbo, Keanrey and Dolph who dared him to do it. Dolph shrugs it off, and says that they were the ones who stole The Scream, which had been stolen shortly before the episode aired.
Real World Location: National Gallery, Oslo
Featured in: 1F04 - Treehouse of Horror IV, 3G02 - Lisa's Sax, GABF21 - See Homer Run
The Death of Marat, Jacques-Louis David, 1793
As Bart introduces the final segment of the Halloween Episode he passes several more paintings, one of them is a parody of The Death of Marat feauturing Homer with a piece of paper that says "Duff Chips Pork" stating his wishlist.
Real World Location: Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium, Brussels
Featured in: 1F04 - Treehouse of Horror IV
Three Musicians, Pablo Picasso, 1921
As Bart is about tell the final story for the Treehouse of Horror IV episode a parody of Picasso's Three Musicians appear in the background, but this time it only features Lisa holding her sax.
When Homer has run out of inspiration on how to focus his art, Marge takes him to the Springfield Museum where he has a dream of various artworks attacking him, Picasso's Three Musicians appear where their instruments turn into machine guns and shoot at Homer. One of them comments "Hasta la Vista, baby" the bullets leave rectacular holes in Homer, following through with the Cubism style in the painting.
Real World Location: Museum of Modern Art, Manhattan, New York
Featured in: 1F04 - Treehosue of Horror IV, AABF15 - Mom and Pop Art
Son of Man, René Magritte, 1964
As Bart is about tell the final story for the Treehouse of Horror IV episode a parody of Magritte's Son of Man, featuring Bart in a Suit hiding his face behind an apple, unlike the real thing, he is not wearing a Bowler Hat.
While Homer and Marge try to get Lisa into a pre-school, one of the kids in the background during the interview is painging a copy of The Son of Man, this time the bowler hat is included.
When Homer's show is interupted by PBS, the producers indicate that people who donate would get a tote bag, an umbrella with a picture of the tote bag, and a CD of museum noises, which features an image of a man looking at a painting of an apple.
Real World Location: Privately Owned, Not on Display
Featured in: 1F04 - Treehosue of Horror IV, 3G02 - Lisa's Sax, AABF11 - Missionary: Impossible
Dogs Playing Poker, C. M. Coolidge, 1903
The Final story was intended to be based around Dogs Playing Poker, which Homer laughs at, but Bart points out that it was far to intense to view so instead the producers slapped together something with Vampires. The painting itself then appears above the couch in place of the usual sail-boat
When Santa's Little Helper is injured because of Mr. Burns's Oil Well, the family go to the vet where in the waiting room there is a picture of the Dogs Playing Poker behind Marge, Bart and Lisa, nobody seems to have any interest.
When Santa's Little Helper and his girlfriend, She's the Fastest start wandering around the city, they somehow get to a carnival where there is a photobooth with a picture and head cutouts, Santa's Little Helper and She's the Fastest pose for the photo which turns out to be a version of dogs playing poker.
When Homer walks into a Religious Store to learn more about the Rapture, in the background behind him is a copy of the Dogs Playing Poker. Homer shows no interest.
Featured in: 1F04 - Treehosue of Horror IV, 2F16 - Who Shot Mr. Burns? (Part One), 2F18 - Two Dozen and One Greyhounds, GABF14 - Thank God, It's Doomsday
Mona Lisa, Leonardo da Vinci, 1506
When the Police announce that they believe that they are dealing with a Mummy, they have the entire Eyptian Wing of the Springfield museum destroyed, for some reason the Mona Lisa was in that wing, as Eddie throws it onto a fire.
After Homer becomes a Stonecutter, he has access to a special shortcut to the Power Plant. Inside, there are a large number of paintings on the wall of the tunnel. One of them is the Mona Lisa.
As Homer and Marge walk to the Enterance of the Local Sprawl Mart, a display of Mona Lisa prints can be seen in the backgorund
When Mr. Burns forces his employees to work for his 4th July Picnic, Homer, Lenny and Carl are disgruntled and break into his wine cellar and get drunk. While drunk they move into a room filled with priceless arworks and artifacts and break everything. When the Police arrive, Homer, Lenny and Carl are all playing Twister with a wine bottle and various paintings. Homer has his foot on the Mona Lisa.
Real World Location: Louvre, Paris
Featured in: 1F04 - Treehouse of Horror IV, 2F09 - Homer the Great, GABF05 - On a Clear Day, I Can't See My Sister, MABF08 - American History X-Cellent
The Last Supper, Leonardo Da Vinci, 14951498
In all instances of this painting except in DABF02 - She of Little Faith, GABF14 - Thank God, It's Doomsday, this painting has mostly been featured in the background, namely above the couch in the Flanders's house, or in the dining room in the Lovejoy's house, it's clear Flanders has more than one copy, as he also has the painting hanging in his rumpus room.
When Mr. Burns rebrands the church, a photo booth, where Jesus's face is cut out and the customers take their place. Bart takes various photos of himself where he's making stupid faces. Marge asks him to do a nice one for Grandma, which he complies to, each one happens to cost $9.99.
When Homer discovers that the rapture is coming, he uses the Last Supper painting to help him calculate when. After first, he indicates that there was only 12 people there, and gets the date wrong, but when he counts it up again, he counts to 13 because Jesus was there also, this time getting the date correct, and because no one believed him, he's the only person who is sent to heaven, talking to God, he manages to return to his family on Earth after seeing how terrible things are.
Real World Location: Santa Maria delle Grazie, Milan
Featured in: 1F14 - Homer Loves Flanders, 2F04 - Bart's Girlfriend, 5F24 - The Joy of Sect, BABF19 - Behind the Laughter, DABF02 - She of Little Faith, GABF14 - Thank God, It's Doomsday
American Gothic, Grant Wood, 1930
As Bart is cleaning the house, he moves his cloth from the wall to a smudge the paint in a copy of American Gothic while he's not looking. As he continues to scrub the paint is totally removed to reveal the message "If you can read this, you scrubed too hard" and is signed by Grant Wood.
Real World Location: Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
Featured in: 1F15 - Bart Gets an Elephant
Composition II of Red, Blue and Yellow, Piet Mondrian, 1930
When Santa's Little Helper is injured because of Mr. Burns's Oil Well, the family go to the vet where in the waiting room there is a picture of the Dogs Playing Poker behind Marge, Bart and Lisa, nobody seems to have any interest.
In the Museum, Homer breaks away from Marge to admire a painting of Campbell's Soup, in the background is a variant of Mondrian's Composition II featuring Black in place of Yellow. Homer doesnt show any interest in it.
Featured in: 2F16 - Who Shot Mr. Burns? (Part One), AABF15 - Mom and Pop Art
Portrait of a Young Man, Raphael, 1514
During the closing phases of World War II, Mr. Burns finds a large number of paintings in a German Castle where they plan to use the paintings for various reasons through means of a tontine where the last surivor of The Flying Hellfish would get the paintings. One such painting was the Portrait of a young man by Raphael which in real life was lost during World War II.
Real World Location: Czartoryski Museum, Cracow, Poland
Featured in: 3F19 - Raging Abe Simpson and His Grumbling Grandson in the Curse of the Flying Hellfish
Life in Hell, Matt Groening, 1977
When Homer runs out of inspiration for his Rage-inspired Outsider Art, Marge takes Homer to the Springfield Museum to look at some more famous artworks. For some reason, one of the paintings is a Life in Hell strip of Akbar and Jeff. Homer comments that Groening shouldnt be in a museum because he can barely draw.
Real World Location: Various Newspapers and paperbacks around the World
Featured in: AABF15 - Mom and Pop Art
Giant Pencil, Claes Oldenberg
When Homer comments that Groening shouldnt be in a museum, he his hit in the head with a giant pencil eraser, exclaiming that he's being erased. It turns out that two janitors are installing a Claes Oldenberg sculture of a pencil. Oldenberg is known for sculpting boring items like pencils.
Featured in: AABF15 - Mom and Pop Art
Venice: The Dagana, J. M. W. Turner, 1834
While taking Homer through the Springfield Museum, Marge comments about various paintings, she states that J. M. W. Turner was in a period when everyone was painting portaits, Turner broke away by painting the Venice Canals. Homer comments about how the streets are composed of water and that you could apparently, ride a walrus to work.
Real World Location: National Gallery, Washington D. C.
Featured in: AABF15 - Mom and Pop Art
The Old Guitarist, Pablo Picasso, 1903
While taking Homer through the Springfield Museum, Marge comments about various paintings, she shows him several paintings by Picasso, commenting the various styles he went through including Blues and Cubism. She comments that by the end of his life, he was just writing prank letters to the editor, dubbing it his angry jerk period.
Real World Location: Art Insitute of Chicago, Illinois
Featured in: AABF15 - Mom and Pop Art
Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, Pablo Picasso, 1907
While taking Homer through the Springfield Museum, Marge comments about various paintings, she shows him several paintings by Picasso, commenting the various styles he went through including Blues and Cubism. She comments that by the end of his life, he was just writing prank letters to the editor, dubbing it his angry jerk period.
Real World Location: Museum of Modern Art, New York City
Featured in: AABF15 - Mom and Pop Art
Homage to the Square, Josef Albers, 1965
In the Museum, Homer breaks away from Marge to admire a painting of Campbell's Soup, in the background is a variant of Albers's Homage to the Square which uses Blue and Red. Homer shows no intrest in it.
Real World Location: Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
Featured in: AABF15 - Mom and Pop Art
Campbells Soup Cans, Andy Warhol, 1962
In the Museum, Homer breaks away from Marge to admire a painting of Campbell's Soup. After dreaming about various other paintings attacking him, Andy Warhol himself starts to throw cans of Cambpells Soup at him, eventually throwing an extremely large can and dropping it on him. Marge wakes Homer up, wondering what Art has done to him as he has done nothing to art, it is revealed that he somehow got Warhol's Campbells Soup Can painting on his arm.
Real World Location: Museum of Modern Art, New York
Featured in: AABF15 - Mom and Pop Art
Self Portrait, Vincent Van Gogh, 1888
When Ranier Wolfcastle announces that he won the contest, the contestants riot, as a Van Gogh exibit shows up, Homer defaces a painting of Van Gogh's with pudding to feature his own Five O'Clock Shadow, after that, it is quicky tipped over and explodes.
Real World Location: Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam
Featured in: AABF18 - They Saved Lisa's Brain
Still Life with Open Bible, Vincent Van Gogh, 1885
When Ranier Wolfcastle announces that he won the contest, the contestants riot, as a Van Gogh exibit shows up, one of the paintings on the truck is The Still Life with Open Bible, after Homer defaces one of the paintings, it is quicky tipped over and explodes.
Real World Location: Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam
Featured in: AABF18 - They Saved Lisa's Brain
The Starry Night, Vincent Van Gogh, 1889
When Ranier Wolfcastle announces that he won the contest, the contestants riot, as a Van Gogh exibit shows up, Homer defaces one of the paintings, while the rest are ignored, the van carring the paintings is then flipped over, and explodes, one of the paintings is a simplied version of The Starry Night.
While Marge is telling a story featuring Maggie as an architect and getting her dreams crushed, Maggie herself is painting her own version of Van Gogh's Starry Night on the Wall with Nail Polish, which is actually pretty good, when Marge discovers, Marge scholds Maggie.
Real World Location: Museum of Modern Art, Manhattan, New York
Featured in: AABF18 - They Saved Lisa's Brain, LABF09 - Four Great Women and a Manicure
Paul Gauguin's Armchair, Vincent Van Gogh, 1888
When Ranier Wolfcastle announces that he won the contest, the contestants riot, as a Van Gogh exibit shows up, Homer defaces one of the paintings, while the rest are ignored, the van carring the paintings is then flipped over, and explodes, one of the paintings is a simplied version of Paul Gauguin's Armchair. (In the shot, it is hidden by Jimbo's Arm)
Real World Location: Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam
Featured in: AABF18 - They Saved Lisa's Brain
A Pair of Shoes, Vincent Van Gogh, 1888
When Ranier Wolfcastle announces that he won the contest, the contestants riot, as a Van Gogh exibit shows up, Homer defaces one of the paintings, while the rest are ignored, the van carring the paintings is then flipped over, and explodes, one of the paintings is a version of Van Gogh's A Pair of shoes, but in the episode it is from a different angle.
Real World Location: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
Featured in: AABF18 - They Saved Lisa's Brain
Guernica, Pablo Picasso, 1937
When Homer causes a black out in Springfield by plugging in an electric Santa during a heat-wave, the town riots and begins to loot while the Simpsons watch from their roof, much to Bart's dismay, he isn't allowed to loot either. Walking by their house is Otto who is carrying the Guernica painting, how he got it, isn't shown.
When Comic Book Guy self publishes his Everyman comic book, Bart comments about how he could be so creative, at the same time, Nelson is showing his own creativity by spray painting a parody of Guernica. Real World Location: Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid
Featured in: DABF17 - Poppa's Got a Brand New Badge, LABF13 - Homer the Whopper
Christina's World, Andrew Wyeth, 1948
During Declan Desmond's film, Homer takes over Mr. Burns's mansion who later returns home. Burns finds that one of his paintings has been covered over by a picture of the family, which he swiftly rips off, the painting that was covered over is a copy of Christina's World, but it features Mr. Burns instead.
Real World Location: Museum of Modern Art, New York City
Featured in: JABF07 - Springfield Up
The Storm on the Sea of Galilee, Rembrandt van Rijn, 1633
When Mr. Burns forces his employees to work for his 4th July Picnic, Homer, Lenny and Carl are disgruntled and break into his wine cellar and get drunk. While drunk they move into a room filled with priceless arworks and artifacts and break everything. Mr. Burns and Smithers find them and call the poilce. When they arrive, Lou identifies The Concert by Vermeer which was also there and that it was stolen, Chief Wiggum has Mr. Burns arrested.
Real World Location: Stolen, Current location unknown (Originally Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston)
Featured in: MABF08 - American History X-Cellent
The Concert, Johannes Vermeer, 1644
When Mr. Burns forces his employees to work for his 4th July Picnic, Homer, Lenny and Carl are disgruntled and break into his wine cellar and get drunk. While drunk they move into a room filled with priceless arworks and artifacts and break everything. Mr. Burns and Smithers find them and call the poilce. When they arrive, Lou identifies the painting and that it was stolen, Chief Wiggum has Mr. Burns arrested.
Real World Location: Stolen, Current location unknown (Originally Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston)
Featured in: MABF08 - American History X-Cellent
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